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Covering the Battle for Blair Mountain in 1921

In this June 6, 2011 photo, this historical marker along W.Va. Route 17 in Blair, W.Va., is the...
In this June 6, 2011 photo, this historical marker along W.Va. Route 17 in Blair, W.Va., is the only visible sign of the 1921 battle here between thousands of armed, unionizing coal miners and the thousands of law enforcement officers and security guards hired to defeat them. At least 16 men died on the mountain, which could be turned into a strip mine. (AP Photo/Vicki Smith)(Vicki Smith | ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Published: Sep. 6, 2021 at 9:09 AM EDT
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LOGAN, W.Va. (AP) - When a mine industry conflict a hundred years ago sparked the largest armed uprising in the United States since the Civil War, The Associated Press was there, sending multiple bulletins each day with updates on each development.

Thousands of coal miners had marched to unionize, fed up with poor wages and living conditions and angered by killings of their supporters.

They were met on Blair Mountain by the anti-union Logan County sheriff.

At least 16 men died in the 12-day battle, which included planes dropping bombs on the miners’ camps, before they surrendered to federal troops sent by President Warren G. Harding on Sept. 3, 1921.

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