Thomas Battle

Daybreak & Noon Meteorologist

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5:30 A.M. to 7:00 A.M. & Noon each Weekday

thomas.battle@wtap.com

Thomas joined WTAP in February 2015 as the Daybreak and Noon Meteorologist.

Thomas Battle joined WTAP in February 2015 as the Daybreak and Noon News Meteorologist.

Thomas was born and raised in Mobile, Alabama. Growing up he actually didn’t realize he had a passion for weather until he was told that not everyone in the world watches the weather every day.

He went to the University of South Alabama for Broadcast Meteorology and graduated in May of 2014. During his time at South Alabama he interned at the local TV station WKRG to learn more about the broadcast industry. In his senior year he was part of a new student-run weather broadcast program that released forecast videos daily.

Thomas enjoys reading whenever he can. His favorite books are the Lord of the Rings, and Ted Dekker is his favorite author. He likes many sports but his favorites are hockey and football. His favorite teams are the Detroit Red Wings, Auburn Tigers, and of course the South Alabama Jaguars.

Despite being a true southerner, Thomas is excited to go north and join the team at WTAP to experience West Virginia firsthand.


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NBC News Headlines

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