UPDATE: Ohio lawmakers fail to override Kasich's veto on abortion bill

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COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - UPDATE: 12/27/2018, 12:30 P.M.

Ohio lawmakers in a Thursday session fell one vote short of overriding Gov. John Kasich's veto on a bill that would have banned abortions after the first fetal heartbeat is detected.

The fetal heartbeat can be detected as soon as six weeks into pregnancy, before most women know they are pregnant.

Term-limited GOP Gov. John Kasich had said in his veto message that the so-called heartbeat bill is unconstitutional.

He said enacting it would prompt a costly and unsuccessful court battle for the state of Ohio.

The House voted Thursday to override the veto during rare post-Christmas voting sessions.

The following Senate vote was 19-13, short of the 20 votes needed to override the veto.

It was Kasich's second veto of similar legislation since 2016.


UPDATE: 12/27/18 12:30 P.M.

A bill broadening gun-owner rights has become law in Ohio, after the Republican-led state Legislature overrode GOP Gov. John Kasich's veto.

The Senate voted 21-11 on Thursday to reject Kasich's decision to strike down the bill. That followed a House override earlier in the day.

The legislation expands gun access for off-duty police officers and allows pre-emption of local gun restrictions, among other things.

Senators had hoped to address Kasich's objections by stripping its so-called stand-your-ground language, but he vetoed the legislation anyway.

Kasich opposed language shifting the burden of proof in self-defense cases from defendants to prosecutors.

He also criticized lawmakers for refusing to debate a "red flag" law allowing gun rights to be temporarily stripped from people who show warning signs of violence.


UPDATE: 12/27/18 12:10 P.M.

The Latest on overrides of vetoes by Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich (all times local):

11:15 a.m.

The Republican-led Ohio House has overridden GOP Gov. John Kasich's veto of legislation imposing one of the most far-reaching abortion restrictions in the nation.

The House eked out its 60-28 override Thursday over strong objections by Democrats, who argued that Ohio is leading a charge against women and that the bill is unconstitutional.

The vote sent the so-called heartbeat bill to the waiting Senate.

The measure would ban abortion after the first fetal heartbeat is detected. That can be as soon as six weeks into pregnancy, before most women know they are pregnant.

The term-limited governor, who leaves office next month, said in a veto message that the bill is unconstitutional and he wanted to avoid a costly and unsuccessful court battle. It was his second veto of similar legislation since 2016.

The House also voted to override Kasich's veto of a bill broadening gun-owner rights.

House members voted 67-22 Thursday to reject Kasich's decision to strike down the legislation . It would expand gun access for off-duty police officers and at subsidized housing complexes and allow pre-emption of local gun restrictions, among other things.

The measure headed immediately to the Senate, which had hoped to appease Kasich by previously stripping the measure's so-called stand-your-ground language.

But he vetoed the legislation anyway, citing a provision that shifts the burden of proof in self-defense cases from defendants to prosecutors. Kasich also scolded lawmakers for refusing to even debate a "red flag" law allowing gun rights to be temporarily stripped from people who show warning signs of violence.

Also on Thursday, a disputed bill that increases death benefits and insurance coverage for slain public safety officers' families while also providing pay raises to Ohio elected officials has become law over the governor's objections.

The House overrode Kasich's veto 70-16 on Thursday. That vote followed a successful veto override in the Senate earlier on Thursday.

In his veto message last Friday, Kasich called the bill's intent to help police and firefighter families "praiseworthy." But he said he couldn't support "the last-minute rush to include a controversial pay raise" without adequate public debate.

Kasich had urged lawmakers to send the original bill to his successor, Republican Gov.-elect Mike DeWine, when the new legislative session begins in January.

Meanwhile, the father of a former state representative has been appointed to temporarily fill his son's seat, addressing a key vacancy in the House.

Ellis Hill of Zanesville, the father of former state Rep. Brian Hill, was seated during a rare post-Christmas voting session on Thursday.

Brian Hill filled a Senate vacancy created by the election of Republican Troy Balderson to Congress.

Also on Thursday, Senate overrode Kasich's veto of legislation containing pay increases for certain Ohio elected officials.

The Senate saved the bill by a vote of 25-6 Thursday, sending it to the House. The measure also increases death benefits and insurance coverage for slain public safety officers' families.

Kasich had urged lawmakers to send the original bill to his successor, Republican Gov.-elect Mike DeWine, when the new legislative session begins in January. But Kasich said legislators should have given raises a more-thorough debate.

(Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


UPDATE: 12/15/18

The Republican-led Legislature sent Ohio Gov. John Kasich a pair of new abortion restrictions on Friday, including legislation banning terminations at the first detectable fetal heartbeat that he's vowed to veto.

Following marathon lame-duck votes that lasted into the wee hours, Ohio lawmakers left open the possibility of returning to override any vetoes. However, the so-called heartbeat bill didn't get the 60 House votes Friday that would be needed.

It was the second time in two years that lawmakers have sent the heartbeat bill to Kasich's desk. He vetoed a similar measure in December 2016.

The final legislation specifies a transvaginal ultrasound isn't required. That would mean detection of the heartbeat would be possible at around 10 weeks, rather than six weeks.

The other bill, approved during a Thursday session that continued overnight, bans dilation and evacuation abortions, one of the most common methods for the procedure.

After the approval of the heartbeat bill, Faith2Action President Janet Porter, who authored the legislation, urged supporters to "Pray!" and to respectfully hound Kasich in hopes he'll change his mind.

Planned Parenthood, other abortion-rights groups and the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio condemned both bills as part of a strategy to overturn the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Roe v. Wade decision, which effectively legalized abortion before viability.

"But women's lives and our right to decide whether to have an abortion is not a political game; women and families suffer when abortion is pushed out of reach," Jocelyn Rosnick, policy director for ACLU of Ohio, said in a statement. "We will never stop fighting on behalf of women in Ohio and across the country."

The civil rights organization stopped short of promising a legal challenge if the bills should become law, a move that would potentially send the issue to the Supreme Court, which now includes conservative Justice Brett Kavanaugh in the place of Anthony Kennedy, who sometimes provided a swing vote.

Once he receives the bill, Kasich has 10 days, excluding Sundays, to act. The House has scheduled a session day for Dec. 27 when an override vote could take place.

(Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


UPDATE: 12/12/18

The Ohio Senate has approved a highly restrictive anti-abortion bill despite indications it has little chance of passage this year.

The GOP-controlled Senate by an 18-13 vote Wednesday passed the measure banning abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected, usually within a few weeks of conception.

The legislation must return to the House for agreement with changes made by the Senate in committee.

Outgoing Republican Gov. John Kasich has promised to veto the bill as he did with a similar measure in 2016.

Ohio Right to Life, the state's oldest and largest anti-abortion group, remains neutral on the bill due to concerns over its constitutionality.

Republican Gov.-elect Mike DeWine, who takes office in January, has said he would sign such a bill if it crossed his desk.

(Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


ORIGINAL STORY: 11/16/18

Lawmakers in the Ohio House have continued a lame-duck session by approving a so-called anti-abortion "heartbeat bill."

The stringent proposal would ban abortions in Ohio after the first fetal heartbeat is detected, as early as six weeks into a pregnancy.

The GOP-controlled House voted 58-35 Thursday in favor of the legislation, which does not include exceptions for rape or incest. The legislation goes next to the Senate.

The stringent proposal would ban abortions in Ohio after the first fetal heartbeat is detected, as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. Republican Gov. John Kasich vetoed a similar bill in December 2016, siding with opponents who contend it is unconstitutional.

On Wednesday the House approved gun legislation eliminating a requirement to retreat in confrontations before using deadly force.

(Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)



 
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